Drypoint Monoprint workshop with Deb Wace

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I’ve recently made time in my life for my printmaking practice but after preparing the GreenRoom space for a flurry of activity, I felt a bit stuck. It’s been too long between prints. I thought learning a new technique would inspire me and give me some momentum! So……I’ve just completed 2 days of monoprint & drypoint Printmaking with Deb Wace.

I want to move away from precise mark-making & static images. I want to work in a free & spontaneous way. I want to create whimsical, interesting marks implying movement, depth & joy.

Deb’s generous sharing of ideas and teaching over the last few days has given me great inspiration, new methods of working and mark- making . My mind is bubbling over with ideas !

I chose to work with images from my childhood – photos of my sisters & I bouncing on trampolines when we young children. With a drypoint tool, I scratched a quick line sketch into the acetate based on the images in the photos.

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The drypoint image on the acetate is then inked in the usual intaglio manner and then ink on the surface of the acetate is manipulated by different means & with different tools to achieve the monoprint. The mark-making is unconstrained, quick & spontaneous. The resulting printed marks are very interesting & lend depth and movement to an otherwise static drypoint image.

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There are endless possibilities with monoprint and a huge scope for experimentation. It was a lot of fun playing with the drypoint images.

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Below are my favourite set of APs for the day. I used a grouting tool and a scrap piece of card to manipulate the ink & some small paper and thread stencils.
It’s titled “Cosmic Sisters”.

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Thank you Deb Wace for a wonderful workshop. Monoprint had opened up a whole new world of possibilities.

RIP Cedar

My gorgeous dog Cedar died of old age at Christmas time. He was with me for 13 years and was a constant and delightful friend.   I have lost my faithfull little companion and life seems bleak without him.   To help me get through my feelings of loss and grief, I have been creating some prints of Cedar.  I’ve christened my new press printing this series of three prints and she works like a dream.    I’m attempting to create some intaglio monoprints of Cedar using some of the methods that Ron Pokrasso employs in his work – stay tuned for those as I’m still creating the plates.   In the meantime these 3 proofs are the first little series of “Cedar”.   I’m trying to move away from single layer/mono-colour prints and utilise multi plates and more colour in my images to create more visual interest and complexity.    These prints are 2 plate drypoint collographs.  During Cedar’s last week of life, I took lots of photos of him.  To create these prints  I used some of my photos to make paper cuts of Cedar.  These I collaged and used a drypoint tool to add more detail.  I achieved the background texture with acrylic medium on a separate plate and I used paper stencils  when printing the two plates together with the usual intaglio inking and wiping.   I think that the printing method I used  is referred to as “pochoir” which is a french term for  Stencil technique.  Or maybe pochoir only refers to hand colouring using stencils??  I need to research this.   Anyway here’s my Cedar boy…….     

                                                    

                                    

Mt Mangana Stag Beetles

I have been working on some drypoint collographs and some paintings of the Mt Mangana Stag Beetle (Lissotes menalcas).  I have never seen one.  They are large flightless beetles,  only found here on Bruny Island and in a few other locations  in  Southern Tasmania.  Their status is “VULNERABLE” (Tasmanian Threatened Species Protection Act 1995) due to its restricted distribution, low  population density  and  loss of habitat bedause logging and deforestation.  Given its dependence on decaying logs for all parts of its life-cycle, any land-use activity that will impact on existing habitat or interrupt the future supply of decaying logs threatens the Mount Mangana stag beetle.